Saturnia

Small village in southern Tuscany, Saturnia is located just 10 minutes from Manciano and is one of the most beautiful attractions of the Maremma.

Famous for its sulphurous water baths at 37 ° C and for the marvelous Cascate del Mulino, Saturnia is also a village rich in history and art, an obligatory stop during a journey to discover the Tuscan Maremma!

The territory of Saturnia was inhabited since the Bronze Age and welcomed the first Etruscan settlements as early as the eighth century BC, the actual birth of the city took place in Roman times, in 280 Saturnia became the administrative seat and prefecture, until it became a colony in 183 BC

In medieval times Saturnia was ruled by the Aldobrandeschi, passed to the city of Orvieto in 1300, and then passed to the Baschi di Montemerano and the Counts Orsini di Pitigliano. In the early fifteenth century the city was conquered by Siena, and remained under the Sienese Republic for almost a century, until 1593, when it was conquered by the Grand Duchy of Tuscany.

What to see in Saturnia :

  • CHURCH OF SANTA MARIA MADDALENA, is the main one of the town, was built in the twelfth century and inside it preserves some precious works of art including a table depicting the Madonna and Child between Saints Sebastian and Mary Magdalene, made between 1475 and 1485 by Benvenuto di Giovanni, a painting from the 1600s, two wooden crosses also from the 1600s and a wooden tabernacle depicting Saints Clare and Elizabeth of Hungary
  • ROCCA ALDOBRANDESCA, dating back to 1100 and built by the Aldobrandeschi, the building was restored in 1400 by the Sienese. In 1924 the Ciacci family had the building completely modified, adding elements in neo-medieval style and a tower.
  • CINTA MURARIA, originally built in Roman times, in the 2nd century BC, the walls were restored by the Aldobrandeschi in 1200. It was then the Sienese in 1400 who fortified the structure. Of the original curtain, one of the access doors remains today, Porta Romana, which marks the crossing point of the Via Clodia